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  • Restoration of wax dolls

    This article appeared in issue 5 of our magazine

    TO RESTORE OR NOT TO RESTOREMeg Glovers work - Before

    By MARGARET GLOVER

    To some people, this little article will have more than a hint of 'deja vu' about it, but it is not directed at those who may have read similar comments in other publications. However, now that dolls have become such a valuable commodity, repeated warnings may not come amiss. .

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  • Bru

    In 1984 Kinloch and Sellers Catalogue became a colour magazine. Jackie Jacobs kindly wrote an article on Bru dolls for us. She also provided the colour photographs. I am re publishing her article from December 1985

     

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    BRU by Jackie Jacobs

    Leon Casimir Bru started up the firm of 'Bru Jne. et Cie' in 1867. Makers of new dolls made of rubber, porcelain, hardened paste bisque dolls, with bodies of white or pink kid, straight or jointed, carved wood with joints at hands and feet; as well as crying and talking dolls. The company was also well known for its extra fine trousseaux, made of the latest fashions and materials, which could be purchased with the doll.

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  • Dismal Desmond

    This article was kindly written by Carol Thomas, a keen Dismal Desmond collector. She has in the region of 100 unique Dismal Desmond items in her collection.


    Dismal Desmond a howling successDismal Desmond was created by Ian Hassall, who was the son of John Hassall, a famous illustrator. I believe he was first heard of in 1926, and first appeared in the Toby magazine for boys.

     The famous toy company dean's rag book brought out many different versions of him as soft toys and also a toy of him on wheels (now very rare). A little later on they brought out Cheerful Desmond (who had a smiling face) but he was never as popular, so he is rarer as they didn't produce him for long. Dismal, featured in one of their famous ragbooks.  "D is for Dismal Desmond" is featured on one of the pages.

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  • 19th Century fashions Part 1 1800 -1870

    This article was written and illustrated by Claire Kinloch.fashion1

    At the beginning of the 19th century, the Empire influence on fashions was still very strong. Simplified styles were in fashion - with high waisted dresses in flimsy materials such as thin cottons, silks and muslins. From long straight sleeves the little puff sleeve appeared, and little bodices and jackets were worn over, and little caps for ladies indoors, and bonnets outdoors. Girls' hair was cut short and curly, progressing through into little high buns on the top of the head with short ringlets. The papier mache dolls particularly lent themselves to fine modelling and very complicated hairstyles could be copied. Underclothes were few and plain - just a thin petticoat and chemise , with the addition of leglets with separate legs, or pantaloons,after 1804. These were displayed under the shorter dresses of young girls and children, and began to be decorated with a little lace on the edges.

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  • Film of Christies Steiff sale

    I found this news clip from just before the amazing Christies Steiff sale last year (or was it the year before now?). i was lucky enough to attend the sale. It was totaly amazing and like going to a museum where you could touch the items. I know it was a while ago now, bought thought I would put the clip on here for posterity. .
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  • Lovely Belton and Steiff bought at Judy's doll fair

    It was good to get back to working at a fair yesterday. Judy Bebbers fair at  Kensington Town Hall was small but  attended. There were more customers throught the doors than there have been in a long time. Below are pictures of some of th items on my table. I found the lovely Belton pictured. I also found an 18 inch Steiff and A Chad Valley Snow White and the seven dwarfs set.Bears at the fairBelton head doll.
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  • Auction report 1982

    The first auction report by Questor

    The first auction report appeared in our issue 10 of our magazine. We had a report in every issue after that. I think you will find it interesting reading. We took our illustrations from old childrens books. Other drawings were done by Claire kinloch. As these articles appear on here, you will get to recognise her style!

    This new and regular addition to the magazine is aimed to give readers who have not attended the sale, an idea of general trends and information on specified dolls. The magazine hopes that all readers will understand that the writer is trying to be objective and that those who have purchased a particular doll which is referred to will not be too elated - or angry!Auction title image

    The sale at Sotheby's Beigravia on 10th February was noteworthy in that a very rare doll was included. Lot 164 was a Jumeau character, mould 208. This character has never appeared in auction in this country and its price to the buyer of £6690 was to be expected. This kind of exaggerated character does not have universal appeal to collectors and only a handful, internationally, of serious collectors would be interested at anything like this price. This example is really a once in a lifetime find, having come privately from a family on the South coast.

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